CfP: SEMINAR ON ACADEMIC FICTION in Cracow, 15-16 Nov, 2019. Deadline for abstracts: October 1, 2019.

CALL FOR PAPERS

SEMINAR ON ACADEMIC FICTION

Institute of English Studies, Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland

15-16 November 2019

The Institute of English Studies at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków and Professor Merritt Moseley invite abstracts for twenty-minute papers on academic fiction.

Papers addressing any aspect of the relationship between academic fiction and the real world, literary commentary on the crises of university education, the lives of academics, creative writers in academia, academia and race, class, or gender, or other relevant topics are welcomed. Relevant non-fiction and film may also be considered. There is no cost for participation.

Submit an abstract of around 150 words with a brief biographical statement to Merritt Moseley, via email at moseley@unca.edu.

The deadline for submission of abstracts is 1 October 2019. Notifications will follow on 10 October.

Time:          Friday-Saturday, 15-16 November 2019

Venue:         Institute of English Studies, al. Mickiewicza 9,

31-120 Kraków, Poland

Organizers: Professor Merritt Moseley moseley@unca.edu

Dr hab. Bożena Kucała bozena.kucala@uj.edu.pl

 

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Lydia Kiesling’s The Golden State

September 6, 2018 – Slate

The Agony of Bureaucracy

A conversation with Lydia Kiesling about The Golden State.

By 

The job Daphne drives away from is at a university that looks a lot like UC–Berkeley. How does your novel compare to other campus novels?

Some of my literary sensibility was for better or worse formed by novels like Lucky Jim, with a comic protagonist we are meant to see as Everyman. I’m amazed at how long it took me to realize not only that Lucky Jim is a terrible Everyman but that there’s a lot of harm written into that book—the casualties of the book (poor Margaret Peel) are presented as funny. I still love the book and have a soft spot for that campus-novel sensibility that is arch and judgmental and barbarously unempathetic, but it’s basically irreconcilable with the way women are socialized, and with the demands of motherhood. My book is in some ways the result of taking a Lucky Jim type of sensibility but putting it on a woman with a baby. Suddenly, the book is completely different. There are stakes.”

Julie Schumacher’s “The Shakespeare Requirement”

August 20, 2018 – The New Republic

The New Campus Novel

Julie Schumacher’s “The Shakespeare Requirement” is a playful, sharp satire of the horrors of modern academia.

By JOSEPHINE LIVINGSTONE

“The Shakespeare Requirement takes on a department in a terrible state. English at Payne is not so much an intellectual nest of idiot vipers, as in The History Man, but rather a collection of people with very little energy left to give, trying in their semi-competent way to keep their subject alive in a hostile culture. Fitger is perhaps the least competent among them—he can barely use email, for example—but the travails of the novel end up testing his worth as a human being, not as an administrator.”

R. O. Kwon’s The Incendiaries

July 31, 2018 – LA Review of Books

Leaps of Doubt in R. O. Kwon’s “The Incendiaries”

by Anna E. Clark

“IS THERE ANY TIME of life more racked by yearning and uncertainty than college? Not, at least, in R. O. Kwon’s The Incendiaries, a debut novel that cannily blurs the line between campus novel and cult lit. As Kwon depicts them, those aching years are a time for confronting the fuzziness of one’s beliefs, for wrestling with the problem of who we want to be.”

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/01/634581276/the-incendiaries-is-an-angsty-back-to-school-novel-about-believing-in-god

https://ew.com/books/2018/08/09/r-o-kwon-the-incendiaries/

https://yaledailynews.com/blog/2018/09/14/red-cups-laundry-machines-and-the-fbi/

CfP: “The American Academic Novel Nowadays: Its Contents and Discontents”, Panel in London, 4-7 April 2018. Deadline for abstracts: September 15, 2017.

Conference Call for Papers

“The American Academic Novel Nowadays: Its Contents and Discontents”

Panel organized within the framework of the European Association for American Studies (EAAS) and British Association for American Studies (BAAS) “Environment, Place and Protest” conference

King’s College London, University College London, and the British Library

London, 4-7 April 2018

This panel aims to explore the various interactions between academe and the real world in contemporary American fiction, non-fiction and film, in connection with modern day issues, discourses, and trends.

Submissions may include academic fiction, non-fiction and film, and the following topics:

  • Indigenous studies
  • Postcolonial studies
  • Race studies
  • Queer and feminist theory & gender studies
  • Ecocriticism and environmental studies
  • Posthumanism and animal studies
  • Refugees, migrations and immigration
  • Cosmopolitanism
  • Trauma, illness and disability studies
  • Critical university studies
  • Digital media and technology
  • Religion
  • Media and journalism
  • Politics and activism

Please send an abstract (250 words), including a title, for a 20-minute paper, and a short bio note by September 15, 2017 to the panel organizer Marta Lysik at marta.lysik@uwr.edu.pl.

Ms. Mentor’s List, for the 10th time

June 12, 2017 – chronicle.com

Evil Deans and the Academic Novel

“This summer’s selections will make you chortle, groan, or sigh with understanding and complicity — unless you are a dean.”

Suzette Mayr’s Dr. Edith Vane and the Hares of Crawley Hall

June 2, 2017 – calgaryherald.com

Suzette Mayr’s new novel looks at the horrors of academia through a satirical lens by Eric Volmers

“After all, there is a certain risk to writing a dark satire about university culture while still working at a university. Dr. Edith Vane and the Hares of Crawley Hall does not take place at the University of Calgary, where Mayr currently teaches creative writing as an associate professor in the faculty of arts. Instead, it takes place in the not-so-hallowed halls of the University of Inivea, a rotting and perhaps haunted piece of brutalist architecture found in a fictional Alberta town. A Toronto Star critic recently described the setting as a ‘delightfully twisted version of Mayr’s Calgary, a funhouse mirror designed with Kafka and Lewis Carroll in mind.’ ”

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More:

http://www.quillandquire.com/omni/suzatte-mayr-how-the-confluence-of-mental-health-issues-and-an-affinity-for-horror-novels-led-to-my-latest-book/