Category Archives: campus novel

Suzette Mayr’s Dr. Edith Vane and the Hares of Crawley Hall

June 2, 2017 – calgaryherald.com

Suzette Mayr’s new novel looks at the horrors of academia through a satirical lens by Eric Volmers

“After all, there is a certain risk to writing a dark satire about university culture while still working at a university. Dr. Edith Vane and the Hares of Crawley Hall does not take place at the University of Calgary, where Mayr currently teaches creative writing as an associate professor in the faculty of arts. Instead, it takes place in the not-so-hallowed halls of the University of Inivea, a rotting and perhaps haunted piece of brutalist architecture found in a fictional Alberta town. A Toronto Star critic recently described the setting as a ‘delightfully twisted version of Mayr’s Calgary, a funhouse mirror designed with Kafka and Lewis Carroll in mind.’ ”

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CfP:”Representations of Textual and Contextual Boundaries in Academic Fiction, Non-Fiction, and Film” in Kaunas, Lithuania 27-28 April, 2017

 

Session organized within the framework of the

“Texts and Contexts: The Phenomenon of Boundaries” conference

Vilnius University Kaunas, Faculty of Humanities

This panel aims to explore the representations of different boundaries at work in academic fiction, non-fiction and film, be they referring to genre and its textual fabric, or the reality and different contexts these narratives depict.

Submissions can relate, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Textual vs. material reality in academic narratives,
  • Student-teacher boundaries and off-limits behaviors in academic narratives,
  • Divisions in the academe,
  • No limits – academic utopias and dystopias,
  • Breaking the boundary of realism – sci-fi academic narratives,
  • Limits of empathy and identification – academics reading and writing academic novels,
  • Frontiers and trailblazers in the academe,
  • Probing the limits of truth, or facts and fiction in academic narratives and life writing – autofiction, roman à  clef etc.,
  • Academic metafiction and breaking down of the fourth wall – writers writing about writers and writing,
  • Limitless navel-gazing? Self-reflexivity in academic narratives, or academics writing about academe and academics
  • Academic novel – genre boundaries and margins

Please send a short abstract (no more than 200 words) for a 20-minute paper, and a bio note by 6 February, 2017 to the session organizer Marta Lysik at marta.lysik@uwr.edu.pl.

A Contemporary Version of Stoner? Loner by Teddy Wayne

September 13, 2016 – vanityfair.com

Loner Author Teddy Wayne on Tackling the Campus Novel and Male Privilege
The author discusses the dark social forces that influenced his latest book.
BY MIKE SACKS

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Vanity Fair contributor and New York Times columnist Teddy Wayne has a new campus novel, Loner (Simon & Schuster), out today, just in time for back-to-school season. Wayne’s third book follows David Federman, an alienated Harvard freshman who soon becomes infatuated with Veronica, a glamorous, sophisticated Manhattanite in his dorm.

What begins as a wry coming-of-age story soon spirals into a dark, disturbing portrait of obsession and an examination of class and gender politics.”

More:

http://kdlg.org/post/first-year-college-student-finds-himself-outclassed-loner#stream/0

http://www.dailynebraskan.com/arts_and_entertainment/hammack-loner-represents-modern-college-life/article_ed40ec9c-8f62-11e6-8e10-ff014ed49d2a.html

Ms. Mentor strikes again

July 3, 2016 – chronicle.com

Academic Novels for Real People. So much for the classics; time to break open the juicy stuff.

“Question (from ‘Hegelia’): All right, I’ve read some of the books on last month’s list of classic academic novels, filled with profs performing intellectually in their native habitats. But where are the juicy academic novels?

Answer: That depends on what you mean by ‘juicy.’ For some readers of academic novels, the scholarly in-jokes are the whole point of the genre. These are the sort of readers who chortle about the literary-theory tidbits in John L’Heureux’s The Handmaid of Desire, or claim to know the real-life inspiration for the pushy promoter of ‘Diana Studies’ in Jennifer Vandever’s The Bronte Project.”

Michel Houellebecq’s Submission

December 31, 2015 – telospress.com

Houellebecq and Huysmans By Ellis Hanson

” […] Houellebecq seems to have mashed together two very different books: one a dreary campus novel about a disillusioned academic who ironically relives the subject of his dissertation, and the other a Swiftian political satire about Islam and the decline of French civilization […]” 

CfP: “The Concepts of Home in the Context of Academe and Academic Fiction,” Kyiv, Ukraine, 17-18 March 2016

Call for Papers

“The Concepts of Home in the Context of Academe and Academic Fiction”

Kyiv, 17-18 March 2016

Panel

organised within the framework of the

International Conference in Literary Studies “Poetics of Home/House”

Kyiv National Linguistic University

 

In which ways does the academia warrant the status of a “second home” for its members? Do the groves of academe function as a safe haven, a sanctuary of classrooms and libraries, a harbor for liberal education, cultural exchange, tradition, and free thought? Can the academia constitute a private microcosm for an expat scholar, conference hopper, or a foreign student? And if it can, as a multicultural space providing a sense of home for representatives of diasporic communities, can it foster dialogue and reduce conflict between societies and countries?

We are looking for explorations of the academia-as-a-home in the short and the long term, in fiction old and new, ranging from Vladimir Nabokov’s Pnin to Michel Houellebecq’s Submission.

We invite papers treating these, and related themes, in all genres and sub-genres referred to as academic fiction by British, American, and international writers.

Possible topics (the list is suggestive not exhaustive):

  • The university as a private universe in academic fiction,
  • Intercultural communication in academic fiction,
  • Multiculturalism in academic fiction,
  • Expat scholars, conference hoppers, and foreign students,
  • Exchange and staff mobility programs (Erasmus+, ISEP, Fulbright etc.),
  • University as shelter,
  • At home in the world: cosmopolitanism in academic novels,
  • Surrogate homes abroad: music, food, and literature in academic fiction,
  • Unwilling dislocations and homesickness in academic fiction,
  • Speaking in tongues: language in and of academic fiction,
  • From home to college: university as a rite of passage,
  • The concept of home in academic life writing.

Please send a short abstract (no more than 200 words) and bio by 15 January, 2016 to Marta Lysik at marta.lysik@uwr.edu.pl.

The language of the panel is English.

 

Robin Kirman’s Bradstreet Gate

August 4, 2015 – USA Today

Campus novel fizzles out of the ‘Gate’ by Patrick Ryan

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“Graduating from the school of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Donna Tartt (The Goldfinch), Robin Kirman barely ekes out a diploma.

With her debut novel, Bradstreet Gate (** out of four), Kirman has drawn comparisons to Tartt, whose 1992 first outing A Secret History followed a band of Ivy League students enraptured by a charismatic academic. Similarly, Bradstreet excavates the secrets and thorny histories of three Harvard undergrads and their professor, set against the backdrop of a campus murder that muddies their allegiances.”